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West Africa

Trade Africa was an initiative between the United States and sub-Saharan Africa that was initiated in 2013 with countries of the East African Community to increase continental and regional trade within Africa, and to expand trade and economic ties among the Unites States, Africa, and other global markets. In 2014, the Trade Africa Initiative expanded to involve new partners, including Cote d’Ivoire, Ghana, Mozambique, Senegal, and Zambia. In support of Trade Africa, the Standards Alliance partnered with Cote d’Ivoire, Ghana, and Senegal to improve compliance with the WTO rules on trade facilitation and technical barriers to trade.” Trade Africa logo

 

  • Afrique (fabriqué en tissu de coton)
  • Cocoa fruit on a tree
  • Typical gifts-Goree
  • African Art Plates
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Priority Sectors

Priority sectors may be added based on interest from the private sector in either country.


Relevant Agreements and Regional Organizations

  • WTO Agreement on Technical Barriers to Trade (TBT)
  • Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS)
  • West African Economic and Monetary Union (WAEMU)
  • African Organization for Standards (ARSO)

Additional Information


COTE D’IVOIRE

Cote d’Ivoire began an economic recovery in 2012 that blossomed into 8.6% GDP growth in 2015. Impressive growth rates made the country the world’s fourth fastest growing economy in 2015 and the sixth most rapidly expanding economy over the past three years. U.S. exports to Cote d’Ivoire were $266 million in 2015, up 11.3% from 2014.The top U.S. exports to Cote d’Ivoire were machinery, plastics, mineral fuels (oil), vehicles, and pharmaceuticals. U.S imports from Cote d’Ivoire totaled slightly over $1 billion in 2015, down 9.4% from 2014. The five largest import categories were cocoa, mineral fuels (oil), rubber, edible fruit and nuts, and wood and wood products. The country is the world’s largest exporter of cocoa and is a major player in world coffee and palm-oil industries. Cote d’Ivoire is eligible for preferential trade benefits under the U.S. African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA). The United States signed a Trade and Investment Framework Agreement (TIFA) with the West African Economic and Monetary Union (UEMOA) in 2002, which includes Cote d’Ivoire.

GHANA

Ghana has been strengthened by a quarter century of relatively sound management, a competitive business environment, and sustained reductions in poverty levels. Despite slowed growth in 2015, Ghana is expected to rebound from 3.5% to 5.2% growth in GDP in 2016. In 2015, U.S. exports to Ghana totaled $950 million, down 20% from the previous year. The top U.S. exports are poultry meat and products, wheat, rice, soybean meal, and processed vegetables. Abundant in natural resources, agriculture accounts for nearly one-quarter of Ghana’s GDP and employs more than half of the nation’s workforce. U.S. imports from Ghana totaled $309 million in 2015, up 13.8% from 2014. The top U.S. imports from Ghana in 2014 included cocoa beans, cocoa paste and cocoa butter, fresh vegetables, tree nuts, and rubber and allied products. Ghana is eligible for preferential trade benefits under the U.S. African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA) and also qualifies for textile and apparel benefits. The United States signed a Trade and Investment Framework Agreement (TIFA) with Ghana in 1999.

SENEGAL

Senegal reached 6.5% growth in 2015 lead by an increase in agricultural productivity and high annual rainfall. U.S. exports to Senegal totaled $196 million in 2015, up 12% from the previous year. The top export categories are mineral fuel (oil), machinery, vehicles, fertilizers, and plastic. U.S. imports from Senegal totaled $72 million in 2015, a 182% increase from 2014. The top imports from Senegal are artificial flowers, feathers, fish and seafood, straw, and esparto (baskets/bags). Senegal is eligible for preferential trade benefits under the U.S. African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA) and also qualifies for textile and apparel benefits. The United States signed a Bilateral Investment Treaty (BIT) with Senegal in 1983, which entered into force in 1990. The U.S. also has a Trade and Investment Framework Agreement (TIFA) with Senegal through its membership in the West African Economic and Monetary Union (UEMOA).